Mapping Counterfeiting - CIB launches a new service

          • London, 03 April 2009

          The ICC Counterfeiting Intelligence Bureau (CIB) has developed the

          Live Counterfeiting Seizure Map and Live Seizure Report to assist industry in quantifying the scale of the trade in illicit goods.

          Mapping Counterfeiting - CIB launches a new service

          The map plots all substantial seizures reported since early 2007 on an easy to navigate Google Map, allowing direct access to the date and location of the seizure, as well as details of the confiscated goods and a hyperlink to the original public source from which the information was gleaned.

          CIB Manager Max Vetter commented: “For years now, business leaders have been asserting that counterfeiting is a global problem affecting every country and sector. This map will go some way to corroborating the intelligence that can help bring this issue to the attention of both the public and law enforcement. For consumers, it will hopefully stress the scale of the problem - an awareness of which will, we hope increase their vigilance in the marketplace. For the authorities, this will highlight the good work being done within certain jurisdictions and help to focus future efforts against this multi-million dollar trade.”

          Taking its cue from sister organisation the International Maritime Bureau (IMB)’s successful Live Piracy Map, the Counterfeiting Seizure Map provides a valuable resource for researchers to gain quick access to statistics and links to sources for further detailed information. Due to the illegal nature of the trade, it is only the reports of seizures that can give any true indication of its scale.

          For instance, the 2008 Counterfeiting Seizure Map shows that eight major seizures took place in a 10-mile square radius in the Philippines during 2008, showing the good work done by law enforcement there to counter the trade. The map thus highlights the efforts of those countries who are responding to this worldwide crime phenomenon. The map highlights some of the hotspots encouraging further action by industry, consumers and law enforcement.

          Mr Vetter added: “We see this map as a springboard to future discussion and awareness of the problem. Counterfeiters who produce one brand of products often are involved in schemes to counterfeit other similar brands. This map will therefore provide important intelligence to manufacturers as possible high risk areas and may encourage the sharing of information and resources to investigate such cases. The counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products and automotive parts which can affect health and safety will be of particular interests to manufacturers and consumers. The CIB will be delighted to receive reports from all interested parties in respect of counterfeits, so that the information can then be verified and input onto the map”

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