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          Opening ceremony of the UN Commission on Science and Technology for Development (CSTD), 23 May 2011, Geneva

          Remarks by Herbert Heitmann, Chair ICC’s Commission on E-Business, IT and Telecoms, Executive Vice President, External Communications, Royal Dutch Shell

          [Intro/thanks]

          • Excellencies, distinguished participants, ladies and gentlemen.
          • It is an honour and pleasure for me to join all of you here today at the beginning of an important session of the CSTD.

          [About ICC]

          • I am speaking here on behalf of the International Chamber of Commerce, its Commission on E-Business, IT and Telecoms, and the BASIS initiative, Business Action to Support the Information Society.
          • ICC is the world business organization. We represent thousands of member companies in over 120 countries. ICC was founded in 1919 by a group of businessmen who believed that good business and fair world trade offer a path to world peace and prosperity. The membership spans fortune 500 companies, SMEs, as well as chambers of commerce, business and trade associations.
          • ICC's mission, to promote international trade and investment through a rules-based multilateral system, has not changed in over 90 years. Today more than ever creating an enabling environment for enterprises of all sizes and sectors to develop, invest and innovate is the route to a more stable, peaceful and prosperous world.
          • We recognize the value of science and technology, and information and communication technologies (ICTs), to help address the world's most pressing issues.

          [EBITT and BASIS]

          • The ICC Commission on E-business IT and Telecoms and its initiative BASIS serves as the voice of global business in the international dialogue on how ICTs and the Internet can better serve as engines of economic growth and social development.
          • ICC and BASIS bring the expertise of the private sector to important post-WSIS activities, such as the Internet Governance Forum, to help build a people-centred information society that brings the benefits of ICTs and the Internet to even more people around the world.
          • The ICC and BASIS diverse membership around the globe and from all economies facilitates important awareness among industry on issues and through dialogue brings views and input into the multistakeholder forums.

          [Internet and business]

          • The Internet has been instrumental in providing greater access to more diverse content, including user-generated. It reduces barriers to entry, increases the ability to cater to niche markets, and improves access to information through the use of search technologies - all contributing to cultural diversity.
          • The last few years we have seen Internet become increasingly instrumental not only for IT related activities, but it has transformed traditional processes in society from agriculture and herding to fishing.
          • In my role at Royal Dutch Shell, I see the daily impact of the Internet and ICTs as we are clearly a major user of these technologies.
          • While I can't disclose our IT spending because it is such a competitive differentiator, it is substantial. Given my involvement in a major IT company before, I can say that some global IT companies would be glad to generate the total revenue that Shell spends on ICT.
          • I also see the clear dependence we and all businesses, governments and users around the world have on these technologies for so many activities and our daily lives.
          • I would like to give you three - quite different - Shell examples of how we use Internet and ICTs - Shell, through the Shell Petroleum Development Company (SPDC) joint venture, sponsored the development and deployment of skooolNigeria, an interactive web-based solution for the teaching and learning of mathematics and science subjects in Nigerian primary and secondary schools. The skooolNigeria website maintains an interactive learning platform for both students and teachers of primary, junior and senior secondary schools. This programme contributes to capacity building.
          • The second example is called Bridge, and it is Shell's epicenter of exception-based surveillance (EBS). By using real-time data from our assets, we can automatically detect anomalies early on and proactively resolve these issues before they become problems for the asset. In this way, we let the equipment tell us when it needs attention and point the asset engineers in the right direction to address those issues.
          • The third example is the Real Time Operations Centre, in short RTOC. An RTOC is a center for well delivery, real time monitoring and operational surveillance of drilling rig activities which helps to improve drilling efficiency. Shell has currently 4 RTOC hubs, in New Orleans, Houston, Aberdeen and Miri. (Wells and the RTOC Infrastructure Services provide specialised IT Support which includes provision and support of IT Services to onshore and offshore drilling rigs and dedicated support resources for RTOCs.)
          • When it comes to development of the Internet and other ICTs, business stands at the forefront - as a dynamic innovator, investor and user. From fast tracking literacy rates to enhancing agricultural productivity or accessing clean energy, every day the products and services business develops are helping to empower and improve the lives of millions of people around the globe.
          • But the private sector can also play a role building infrastructure and deliver required goods when the right conditions are put in place. Business contributes to establishing enabling environments through education initiatives, promoting innovation and creativity, public - private research and development partnerships.

          [Cooperation for success]

          • Yet we cannot hope for development without cooperation among all stakeholders. Cooperation with governments, policymakers and other stakeholders is primordial to achieving the 'enabling' conditions that allow business to innovate, and in turn, societies to prosper.
          • Whenever we see evidence of the private sector driving development, it is usually because governments got the conditions right.
          • Such an environment that enables development requires:
            • independent regulators
            • respect for the rule of law
            • intellectual property rights protection and enforcement
            • pro-competitive legal, policy and regulatory frameworks that also increase user choice regarding quality and lower cost of services
            • independent courts
            • policy approaches that foster entrepreneurship.
          • The only way to continue to address these matters and to bring the benefits of the Internet to the next billion users is through cooperation, collaboration, joint dialogue and action.

          [Emerging economies as new traders]

          • Governments have a vital role to play creating an enabling environment. In emerging economies and least developed countries we have witnessed that the greatest source of development has been business, enterprise creation, productivity growth and job creation. The biggest success stories, for example India, have revealed the strong correlation between network and economic growth.
          • In the most underdeveloped economies, foreign direct investment can create the minimum threshold required for the private sector to thrive.

          [CSTD link]

          • Science and technology are also essential for development and the empowerment of individuals and ICC BASIS applauds the CSTD's recognition of the intersection of the WSIS follow up role entrusted by the WSIS Tunis Agenda.

          [WSIS and IGF]

          • Since the WSIS in 2005, tremendous progress has been made in building communications and exchange of experience across stakeholder groups which is leading to more informed policy decisions at national, regional and international levels.
          • The WSIS has achieved a new model for global level policy discussions that is truly multistakeholder, recognizing the value and experience of governments, business, civil society, and the Internet technical community in addressing the range of ICT and Internet governance issues that impact the promotion of a people-centred information society.
          • The range of countries and number of individuals with access to the information society has grown and continues to grow significantly. In 2005 there were 1 million Internet subscribers and 2 billion mobile subscribers. In just five years this increased to 2 billion Internet subscribers and 5 billion mobile subscribers.
          • The WSIS achievements, including the Internet Governance Forum, can take credit for contributing to this growth.
          • The IGF has become an effective space for unique dialogue and exchange over the past 5 years, and increased awareness of issues resulting in cooperation, collaboration and coordination on a wide range of issues. The CSTD Chair's working group on IGF improvements has made substantive progress on many areas that can continue to be built upon.
          • We believe that with a bit more time, this group can make further progress. We share the opinion of many other stakeholders that there is no other forum like the IGF where governments, business, civil society, the Internet technical community and international/intergovernmental stakeholders can come together on an equal footing to discuss Internet policy issues without the constraints of negotiations and decision-making. This is of huge value, and there are enough other organizations that are designed for decision-making.
          • Continuing the progress and dialogue on IGF improvements in a multistakeholder setting is essential.
          • In the ever-evolving Internet realm, it is essential that we all can benefit from each other's experiences, figure out what the challenges are and share options for developing policy and practice approaches to Internet governance issues.
          • Global business believes that the IGF, with its founding multistakeholder principles intact will continue to play a critical role in its second 5-year mandate. Not only in deliverance on the objectives of the Digital Millennium Goals, but also towards and on-going sharing of information and practices that are essential for ICT globally and across all sectors.
          • Despite the concerns of some that the IGF does not produce written declarations or recommendations, the substance of information is tremendous, a resource of great importance. Easing accessibility and use of the information is paramount. It is incumbent upon us to find more ways to capture the range of these recommendations and further inform policymaking around the world at the national, regional and international levels.
          • Each organization and process faces challenges as it grows, to ensure solid funding for its priority activities. The IGF's independent secretariat has done a wonderful job over the years, with the multistakeholder funding through the trust fund together with various coordinated in-kind donation projects. This has and will need to be increased in order to support the improvements needed.
          • We believe it is for all stakeholders to look at the situation and come up with support, both financial and in-kind. We need to work together to augment the range of tools and support for stakeholders from around the world to participate in the IGF, particularly from the less developed and developing regions.
          • However money alone is not the answer to all of the challenges. We must also raise awareness, refine remote participation tools, and extend outreach to include all stakeholders.

          [Conclusion]

          Ladies and Gentlemen, our common goal is to use science and technologies to bring economic and social development to more people around this world. We are collectively making advances, in myriad ways, toward fulfilling WSIS goals and commitments.

          Diversity, vision and leadership make business a critical stakeholder and partner for the future of the Internet and ICTs.

          Business is proud of the role that it plays in investing, designing, building, operating, powering and maintaining the infrastructure that has allowed so many more people to enjoy the benefits of the information society. We want to continue engaging with all stakeholders to spread the benefits of the information society more widely.

          I wish you all a successful set of meetings this week!

          Ladies and Gentlemen, our common goal is to use science and technologies to bring economic and social development to more people around this world. We are collectively making advances, in myriad ways, toward fulfilling WSIS goals and commitments.

          Diversity, vision and leadership make business a critical stakeholder and partner for the future of the Internet and ICTs.
          Business is proud of the role that it plays in investing, designing, building, operating, powering and maintaining the infrastructure that has allowed so many more people to enjoy the benefits of the information society. We want to continue engaging with all stakeholders to spread the benefits of the information society more widely.

          I wish you all a successful set of meetings this week!